About

HOW DOES IT WORK?

WHAT IS A FRINGE FESTIVAL?

A Fringe festival is a festival of performing arts. The basic rules are that it is open access, which means anyone can participate. Also that there is no censorship, which means artists are free to perform whatever they wish.

WHAT IS THE AIM OF BUSH FRINGES?

​Bush Fringes policy is to bring performance art to regional cities.Bush Fringes wishes to attract local artists to perform and for audiences to enjoy a different, more artistic, form of entertainment.

WHAT IS IN IT FOR AUDIENCES?

A Fringe festival presents a different type of entertainment due to the fact that artists are allowed to do whatever they wish. Thus it becomes art for art’s sake.

WHAT IS IN IT FOR ARTISTS?

For existing artists these Fringe festivals are another opportunity to perform. For local artists and emerging artists these festivals present a stepping stone to other venues.

HOW LONG DOES IT GO FOR?

4 days, from Thursday to Sunday.

WHAT SIZE IS THE FRINGE?

Bush Fringes are small festivals with our first priority to the artists. The smaller the festival the bigger the audience numbers and the more financial returns go straight to the artists. Similar small festivals boast an average of 42 audience members to each show. Therefore each festival is limited to 5 to 6 venues.

FESTIVAL POLICY

Bush Fringes provides a safe and inclusive space for our performers and patrons. We do not tolerate harassment, bullying, racism, homophobia, sexism or any kind of disrespect towards our artists, crew, venue staff or other patrons.

FESTIVAL DIRECTOR

PHILLIP AUGHEY

  • BA Communications
  • Founder of the Newcastle Fringe
  • Published author “The Red Dust” - Black Cockie Press
  • Actor, director, producer and writer for the touring theatre company
  • CONDA judge
  • www.anvilcreektheatre.com

FESTIVAL CONSULTANT

MARY Marshall

  • Member - Newcastle Fringe
  • Volunteer elf
  • 15 years front of house experience

Bush Fringes is insured by ....

Bush Fringes ABN 31 593 563 245

Bush Fringes acknowledge the traditional custodians and owners of the land that we work and create on. We pay our respects to indigenous elders past, present and emerging. Sovereignty has never been ceded. It always has been, and always will be, Aboriginal land.